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EA & NAEA


Terry D
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Just an announcement, I have passed all three parts and the EA exam and have submitted my application for Enrollment.  For those who are considering becoming an EA, I will tell you the three parts are not a cake walk but are not as difficult as when there were four parts. I tried becoming an EA way back when it was a paper-pencil test. Didn't do well so I put it on the back burner until I retired from my teaching job. Fast forward 26 years and here we are. 

For those who are new or seasoned EA's did you join the NAEA? They are offering a good discount for new EA's just wondering if it is worth the investment. Opinions please. 

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Good job, Terry!  A lot of effort went into that feat.  I am a member of NAEA.  It's pricey.  Their quarterly journal is very informative and their courses are good.  Our state chapter offered Ethics at no cost this year, and if you're missing credits you can take exams from the journal for a modest fee.  They email a weekly newsletter that keeps you informed of the latest tax developments.  They have a lobbying arm in congress (always asking for contributions for it), and their coverage of it does let you know what legislators are thinking and doing.  Try it at the discounted price and see if it's worth it to you.

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10 hours ago, Terry D said:

For those who are new or seasoned EA's did you join the NAEA? They are offering a good discount for new EA's just wondering if it is worth the investment. Opinions please. 

I looked at it a couple times and just couldn't find the value for the money - and the double fee because you had to join your state at the same time (back in the day).   I just don't see advocacy, I don't see effective lobbying, and I don't see promotion of the EA license in the public eye from them.   

Ask yourself how many people on the street know what an EA is.   When that number is 25% of the people who know what a CPA is, then I will consider joining.

Tom
Longview, TX

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Congratulations, Terry!  💯

As far as joining NAEA goes, it depends on what you are looking for from a professional organization  I joined primarily because of the local chapter of the state society.  Pre-Covid, I found it a wonderful networking opportunity.  Now, not so much.  The education opportunities are also excellent, and i have attended some of the events sponsored by the NC state chapter since I am not too far from the state line.  Whether the difference in the member/non-member price is worth it to you, or receiving another publication/email that you have difficulty finding time to read, is a decision you have to make so as Sara suggested you might want to try it for a year at the reduced price and see what you think.  I will warn you that it increases your CE requirement from the IRS required 24 hours per year to a 30 hours per year requirement by NAEA. 

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Congratulations , Terry

I have been an EA since 1992, passed when it was a 2 day paper exam.

I have been an NAEA member 3 different times, however there isn't a local chapter, so no local classes.

The cost versus the benefits never quite worked for me.

Oregon requires me to get 30 Hrs of CPE, which I get from a combination of The Tax Book(self study), and online classes from OSCPA, IRS and the CPAacademy.

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15 hours ago, TAXMAN said:

Terry what did you use as study guides and what did you find the hardest part to be?

I used Gleim which is much harder than the actual tests. However, with Gleim you will definitely learn which makes it better in my opinion. I wanted to advance my knowledge as well pass the tests. 

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I used the 1st year NAEA discount to join and have remained with them ever since. I used to attend the CtSEA education events for both the education and the networking. Now, my main group is the NY/CT-ATP for education and networking, because its location is closer and I can network with both NY and CT preparers (I have NY commuters and NY residents in my CT practice, not just CT residents). However, I've benefited from the NAEA publications and e-newsletters so remained a member. During Covid, I made use of my NAEA member price to take webinars from the NYSSEA and VASEA and elsewhere at the lower member price. NAEA membership also offers you 25% off CCH CPELink education and CCH publications, UPS discounts, other benefits, and a couple FREE classes.

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Congrats - I used Gleim back in the pencil days.

I joined the NAEA and cancelled after 3 years as my state chapter was completely incompetent. Mailings were sent out AFTER events happened which made be think it was probably on purpose it happened so consistently.

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On 1/13/2022 at 8:47 PM, Terry D said:

...passed...EA...the three parts are not a cake walk but are not as difficult as when there were four parts...when it was a paper-pencil test...join the NAEA?...good discount...Opinions please. 

Congratulations and thanks for prompting a trip down memory lane for me. 

To answer your question, I never did join.  Lots of pros and cons, but I just didn't like their approach.  Sample magazine had good info and I assumed they were lobbying (even if we can't get a catchier name change), but like Tom said, the new letterhead printer asked me "What's an EA?"  Nothing deal-breaking but then EA state society wrote me almost demanding I join as a moral imperative while dissing another accounting group (required 40 hours CPE) I was in at the time. Also, I'd have to pay state plus  national dues. So, no go.

The tests? Ah, I got some good laughs, and scares, thinking of those two days (used Gleim books too-very good).  It was 2005. IRS wanted licenses for everybody except EAs, CPAs, attorneys. Good thing I got a no-computer/calculator education - those testers took away everything, gave us a pencil and scratch paper - that was it. If you didn't know your multiplication tables, you were dead in the water.  

I had studied two weeks for the test - was a little set back when 30 minutes pre-test others said "six months" / "a year" / "taking it 3rd time".  Upshot, I flunked the first year (figured I knew taxes, but who knew a sister corporation didn't require a real sister?).

Year two: 2006-last four-part.  Passed (scores not disclosed-thankfully).  Secret of success: six months study, prayer and (must be) divine intervention.  Just for extra pull, gave ten bucks to a panhandler on the way out.

Two ironic things stand out: (1) Before taking test, a lawyer told me "No point in rushing. It takes government a while to move."  How true - it's 2022 and barbers can still do tax returns.   (2) Before we left, the person testing us held up one of those green 1040EZ pamphlets (remember them?) and said "Those of you who pass should be able to fill out this form." :D 

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Congratulations, Terry!

I used to be an NAEA (and state affiliate) member but let them lapse after dithering for some years.  Should have let them lapse earlier.  Networking was nice enough for some years but overall rather limited.  Never felt I got my money's worth from the membership. Verifyle Pro is a free benefit - but I can buy it for 1/3 the price of the NAEA. Try it with the discount for a year and see if you like it. If not, then drop it.

I've found NATP has some excellent discounts including their CPE.  Also if you want to do any representation, Tax Rep LLC (Eric Green's group) does frequent free 1-and 2-hour online classes.  I'll be doing a freebie on innocent spouse issues with them this Friday.  (Highly recommended to anyone who does any representation.)

I also used Gleim for prep, back in the day.  2003, I think it was.  Maybe 2004 (not later than that).  Two days, paper only, once a year only.  I studied for six weeks, passed all four first try.  Yeah, got a bit freaked when some others said it was their 3rd or 4th try.  Best things about Gleim were 1. Learning not to re-think: answer once, move on, don't look back - that 2nd answer is usually wrong.  2. Recognizing the questions where answers would not be presented properly (multiples were right, none were right, too poorly worded to determine a right answer, etc). Maybe those are fixed now.

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14 hours ago, Catherine said:

 Also if you want to do any representation, Tax Rep LLC (Eric Green's group) does frequent free 1-and 2-hour online classes.  I'll be doing a freebie on innocent spouse issues with them this Friday. 

Thanks for that.

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